Take action to help the recovery

The effect of the fires of 2019-2020 will live long in our landscape around the country.

The recovery requires effort at a scale which we have not experienced before. The sheer magnitude of the fires, the sensitive nature of many of the areas affected, and the range of wildlife that have been displaced is enormous.

Beyond the terrible human and community impacts, we already know that the environmental damage is enormous. Millions of native animals have been lost, many species are under threat and massive areas of habitat have been impacted.

However, people like you can make a difference, wherever you are.

Through citizen science activities you can gather observations and data, share it easily with researchers, and even play a role in reviewing information for research teams who are doing the vital work of informing how recovery projects should work.

How to get involved

We believe everyone should be able to get involved in caring for nature.

Citizen science is a great way to make a difference for bushfire recovery, even in the midst of COVID-19, because it doesn't rely on large groups coming together to get something done. In some cases, it might be something you can do whilst you're out on a walk, or even in free time at home.

If you want to make a tangible difference to the bushfire recovery now, you can contribute and arm researchers, rangers and traditional owners with the kind of observations and data they need to make good decisions and gain funding for recovery projects.

We've rounded up a series of projects you can contribute to today which will help the recovery.


Citizen Science Projects


Birdata

Help the recovery by contributing information on birds in your local area, wherever you are.

How will it help?

The information you provide helps BirdLife understand, protect and advocate for our native birds, especially those that are threatened or endangered following the fires.

Great for:

  • Any location
  • Any time
  • Android, iOS or Web

Birdata

Become a 'twitcher' to contribute to research on birds and their habitat


Wildlife Spotter

Support the recovery from the comfort of your home by reviewing footage from the field, and spotting wildlife.

How will it help?

Good decisions about conservation are based on evidence. Support researchers, rangers and policy makers to make decisions based on what's happening in bushfire affected regions, by identifying what species are caught on cameras out in the field.

Great for:

  • Any location
  • Any time
  • Web

Wildlife Spotters, who are citizen science digital volunteers, are part of an active community that supports scientific investigation by reviewing camera-trap research footage on-line. Wildlife Spotters contribute to the national understanding of our unique environments by identifying fauna sightings to be recorded and added into the Atlas of Living Australia database.

Wildlife Spotter

Watch and spot wildlife active in recovery zones, from your home


Frog ID

Most of our frog species only live in Australia, and 16 of those species are in need of further protection after the 2019/2020 fire season.

How will it help?

Croaks, whistles, bleats and barks - every frog species makes a different sound. By recording a frog call with the Australian Museums FrogID app, you can identify the frogs in your area and contribute to the mapping of species around the country. This is especially vital in fire affected regions at the moment, to help identify populations and actions needed to protect them.

Great for:

  • Any location, but especially near bushfire affected regions.
  • Best at start and end of the day and night time.
  • Smartphone: Android or iOS

Frog ID

Start recording frog calls in your area and support their protection


Echidna CSI

Although an iconic native Australian animal, we do not know much about echidnas’ wild populations, but we do know that much of their habitat was impacted by the 2019-2020 fires.

How will it help?

By downloading the app and reporting your sightings, you'll be helping researches understand where they are and how they are recovering from the fires. Researchers at Adelaide University developed the Echidna CSI app, so that Citizen Scientists just like you can tell them where echidnas are, what they are doing, and if they are healthy - so we can all work together towards their conservation.

Great for:

  • Any location
  • Any time
  • Smartphone: Android or iOS

Echidna CSI

Photograph echidnas in your area, or collect their scat, to build evidence of how fires have affected populations nationwide